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Management and socio-economics of tsetse control

THE SOCIO-ECONOMICS OF TSETSE CONTROL USING BAIT TECHNOLOGIES

Introduction

Tsetse Plan will calculate plans, using combinations of insecticide-treated cattle and targets, for the control of tsetse for a specified area with a specified degree and nature of tsetse challenge (click here to go to Tsetse Plan).

This module is a set of linked web-pages intended to introduce the implementing agencies of relatively small, community-based tsetse control programmes to the most important socio-economic and institutional factors which will influence the design of such a programme, and will help or hinder its sustainability.

Since the circumstances of tsetse control vary so widely, and because designing and managing a tsetse control programme involves so many skills and methodologies, it does not pretend to be a step-by-step guide, but an overall introduction with extended discussion of some points not treated elsewhere.

The typical case addressed by this module is where an agency has identified a community or communities of livestock owners who are suffering some direct ill-effects of trypanosomiasis in the areas where they currently keep livestock. The community may also be suffering from not grazing as much as they would like in other areas where there is high trypanosomiasis challenge.

Situations where a community wishes to move, or government wishes it to move, to an area not previously grazed because of tsetse are different in important respects. They will require a great deal more central planning on the part of government, and are likely to require a more formal and quantified ex-ante appraisal.

In planning a community-based project, the over-riding requirement is a participatory approach, which should be followed at all stages of the project cycle: identification, appraisal, design, implementation and monitoring/evaluation. For more on what a participatory approach means in the context of tsetse control click here.

Within an overall participatory approach, for a tsetse control project to be sustainable, attention must be paid to five key factors. In broad order of their importance in constraining tsetse control, the five factors are as below. Clicking on each factor will lead to further explanatory text, and then to options for investigation and management.


Profitability
Entry/transitional costs
Cashflow
Collective action
Knowledge and attitudes

 

 

 


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