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Management and socio-economics of tsetse control

Managing Collective Action

It is not sufficient to establish that a community has potential for collective action, and in what institution(s) that potential lies. Collective action has to be encouraged and managed. Some of the key decisions, which should be taken in the light of the preferred technologies and participatory study are as follows:

• Should tsetse control make use of an existing organisation, such as a village development committee, or establish a new organisation, such as a livestock committee?

• What sizes of institutions should be established, and at how many levels? Small groups are thought to be best for allowing mebers to monitor and assist each others’ collective action, but organisation over a wider geographical are is also likely to be important.

• Does collective action need supporting by a motivational campaign, and what are the appropriate means or media for this? Should community development workers be engaged for this purpose? (The answers to these questions will also depend on the state of knowledge and attitudes in the community regarding tsetse control.)

• To what extent should the tasks of pour-on application and/or trap maintenance, be delegated to individuals (who will then probably need some remuneration) or left to cattle-owners, and what are the implications for training?

• Who will be responsible for purchasing of inputs and handling funds, and what mechanisms should be established for their accountability to the committee or the community at large?

• Can the ability of the organisation to sanction those who do not comply in tsetse control be strengthened – what sanctions are legally available to them and which are ethical to promote?

 


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